Sea kayaking in Dingle was one of the things the drew us to Vagabond Tours.  We are an outdoorsy crew, owning two canoes and a kayak back home.  We knew we were going to be sea kayaking this trip, come hell or high water.  It was also one of the keys to a successful family trip–you are who you are, no matter where in the world you go.

Irish Adventures was right on the waterfront in downtown Dingle.  Our guide, Noel, was funny and informative.  He also took some great images, although he didn’t seem to understand why it would pain me not to be able to take them myself.  Someday, I would love to have a camera or rig that can survive sea kayaking, but this was not that day.


A few people were in tandem kayaks, but most were solo.  There was a quick lesson and continued instruction for those brand new to kayaking.  Michelle was a complete newcomer to sea kayaking but she was able to learn the techniques quickly from Noel and had no problem with the paddle.  We paddled along the bay in search of the famed Fungi the Dolphin.  I had read about him ahead of time and my bullshit detector lead me to believe there were a  few dolphins off the coast and on the rare occasion one was spotted, they were called Fungi.  Or that Fungi was a bit like the Dread Pirate Roberts or a child’s goldfish, secretly replaced every time he passed on.

It turns out there was no need for the cynicism–Fungi is the rare lone dolphin, and he has been alive for over 20 years.  Like all Irish folks, he is quite friendly and regularly gets close to passing boats, including kayaks.  The closest we got was about 50 yards away, which was a bummer for myself and the other animal loved on the trip, but it was still pretty cool.


After the excitement of Fungi, we got to explore the nuances of the Dingle Peninsula’s photogenic coast.  We even paddled through a few underwater caves getting a chance to see the wildlife in the clear water.  Starfish, sea anemones and fish were everywhere.  We had been in Ireland for about a week already, but this was the first time we were seeing cliffs up close, and from water level.  We also learned more about the area’s history and some of the local creatures of the land and air.

The paddle back was against the wind and tide, and also the day after Kev and I went surfing.  Unless you’ve got Michelle Obama arms, I do not recommend so many arm-straining activities in quick succession.  But such is life for a world traveler!  I absolutely recommend Irish Adventures to anybody from a newbie to a sea kayaking veteran.  It’s a great way to see something different.  Noel was a great guide and the experience of exploring sea caves was unlike any other view of Ireland.




There are half-day (3 hours) and full-day tours available.  Half-day tours like mine are 3 hours and available to paddlers age 12+ of all levels.  Cost €50 adult, €45 teenagers, €40 under 12’s.  Full day paddles are from €85 to €100.  They are categorized as Medium (5+ hours, open to all 14+) and Hard (5-6 hours, age 16+.)  You will need to bring swimwear and a towel.  Wet suits and all other equipment are provided.

All photos courtesy of Irish Adventures.  

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