Philadelphia in Photos

Philadelphia in Photos

A great opportunity called BlogHouse brought me back to the City of Brotherly Love, a decade after my first visit with Science Team in middle school. Lately I’ve been focusing on travel within North America, to new cities as well as returning to those I’ve always wanted to see again. At Sherry Ott‘s instruction, we set out to shoot the city in a unique way. I haven’t been doing as much street shooting lately, since candid portraits and photo essays have been dominating what little time I have for photography these days. It was good to get out there and flex the muscles; I hope you see not only a city you recognize, but a few surprises as well! Hiding from the heat outside the Liberty Bell.   This year, Visit Philly is focused on the many modern aspects Philly’s historic district, like Second Story Brewing. I only wish I had more time to check out all the other breweries. Philadelphia has a real growing craft beer scene!           Philadelphia does an amazing job translating its historical significance into fun experiences for all ages. This includes the “Once Upon a Nation” storytelling initiative, where docents at benches scattered throughout the historic district share engaging slices of Philadelphia history, often incorporating audience participation. Kids can even collect stickers at each bench, completing an American flag.       Historic Philly is just as lovely as I remember it, right down to the “busy body” on the window on the left, which was a clever way to see who was knocking at your door without being seen.  ...

Giveaway: the Women in Travel Summit 2016

As you may know, I’m on the planning team for the Women in Travel Summit (WITS), the only travel blogging conference for and by women. It’s held March 18-20, 2016 in Southern California at the Hotel Irvine, where 500 women travelers, blogger and entrepreneurs will come together to network, meet brands, and get excited about our adventures around the world! Aside from having a schedule packed with amazing speakers, I’m proud of the strong, supportive, diverse community we’ve built around WITS. One of the perks of being on the planning team is that I have a discount for you all and I’m giving one ticket to WITS away for free! So, here’s the deal: Tweet about why you’re excited to go to WITS, tagging me (@DeliaMary) and #WITS16 on twitter Get an additional entry (up to 10 total per person) for every time you share any of the following on twitter (always tagging me and #WITS16, of course!): A reason you’re excited to go to WITS My 10% discount code (DELIAWITS) with the registration link: http://bit.ly/WITStix This tweet about the contest Get 10 additional entries by registering for WITS with my 10% discount code (DELIAWITS) before the contest deadline The deadline to enter is midnight ET on 2/15/16 If the winner has already bought their ticket, we’ll refund it.  Need to be sold on the awesomeness of WITS? Watch this great video of last year’s event, made by one of our amazing volunteers, Jemma Byrne. Good luck, happy tweeting and see you in March! Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens...
Open Wound: Life in a Batey

Open Wound: Life in a Batey

On the first day that my fellow student researchers and I returned to Mata los Indios in the Dominican Republic, our trek was pretty muddy. As we squished and squelched our way to the batey, the velcro on my trusty Merrell sandals became so clogged that it wouldn’t function, leaving me with a raw, open blister on the inside of my right ankle. Through cement mixing, dirt sifting, and slogging across Cruz Verde in the rain, keeping it clean and dry was impossible. I tried to go barefoot when inside and to refrain from complaining, but during an even muddier return trip to Mata los Indios, it was painful and dirt-filled. Mata los Indios, a small batey in the rural province of Monte Plata, is less than a mile from the village of Cruz Verde, where we were staying, but a world away economically. It’s hard to imagine that there is something smaller or more vulnerable than a village, but in the Dominican Republic, there is: a batey. A batey is a small company town that was set up for sugar cane workers decades ago. There are hundreds of them throughout the country, near the cane fields and usually owned by either the government or the owner of the fields. There have been times in the last century when workers were imprisoned on the batey until the work was done, and there was a time when all workers suspected of being Haitian were rounded up and murdered en masse. A typical batey cement block structure. Inside it would likely be broken up into several different homes.  Most of the sugar industry left the Dominican...
Hurling in County Clare: Up the Banner!

Hurling in County Clare: Up the Banner!

Our first full day in Ireland turned out to be the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, between County Clare and County Cork. As we drove west from Dublin to Galway, we kept passing cars decked out in blue and yellow flags. As we got to Clare, we started seeing homes with all manner of decorations. Since we were in Clare at the appointed time, our Vagabond guide, Wendy, asked if we’d like to stop into a pub to watch the match. This is a great example of the benefit of a small, personalized tour–they can be nimble in the way a large tour never could. Chatting with strangers in pubs while getting a glimpse of every day Ireland was really our top priority, so we were happy to go with Wendy’s improvisation. Like everywhere in Ireland, people were friendly and welcoming, answering all our questions about the sport. Hurling is like a blend of field hockey and lacrosse.  15 players on as side try to get the ball, or sliotar, through the uprights, either above the crossbar for one point, or below it for a goal, which is three points. They whack the ball with a stick called a hurley that has a bit of a clubbed end, which is scooped on one side. It looks rather like a field hockey stick. Wendy had gone over the basics of play and scoring, but it was interesting to learn more about hurling as a cultural institution.  Played for over 3,000 years, hurling is one of the Gaelic sports, governed by the GAA (Gaelic Athletic Association.)  All the players are amateurs (one...
Going Local in an Irish Pub in Dingle

Going Local in an Irish Pub in Dingle

From the beginning, the main goal of our family trip to Ireland, aside from great outdoor adventures, was to soak up daily Irish life. The Irish pub experience was a priority, talking to locals, buying rounds and listening to sessions of live music, whether traditional or contemporary. My dad and brother would have hooked themselves up to a Guinness IV drip if that was an option.  Luckily, Vagabond Tours focuses on local, small-town experiences and really allows travelers to direct the priorities of the tour, so we spent every night in one Irish pub or another listening to live music and sampling stout. Perhaps the best, though, happened completely by accident. We were in Dingle, an amazing little seaside town just over the Conner Pass. We started our night at a pub that many had recommended to us, but it didn’t take long to realize that the only Irish folks inside were working the bar or playing the session. It was a nice enough place and the music was great, but we didn’t come to Ireland to hang out with other Irish-Americans. Instead, we headed toward the infamous Dick Mack’s. All night I had been insisting that there’s no way an Irish pub of  such infamy would close early on a weekend, so of course when we arrived at around 10 or 11, the place was shuttered. Our hopes of Dick Mack’s smashed, we walked back toward our hotel, giving up on our plans for an Irish pub for the night. We met up with Kevin and Michelle, my brother and sister-in-law, who had gone ahead to scout seats...
Dune Bashing in Qatar: Getting out of Doha

Dune Bashing in Qatar: Getting out of Doha

“Dune Bashing.” As soon as I heard the term, I know I wanted to go do it. I’ve been in Doha, Qatar since the start of the new year running a conference for work.  As part of an effort to let attendees relax and get to know the country better, our partners organized a caravan of off-road vehicles to take us romping around the desert near the Saudi border.  The ride was actually quite gentle compared to my past experience in the Egyptian Sahara, but it was still thrilling to cruise along the very edge of a dune, and bounce around the desert for a while. At this camp at the edge of the desert, about an hour away from the city of Doha, we took a break while the drivers got to work. They let the air out of all the tires, filling their air was a loud hiss that could be heard over the wind whistling through the sand. We enjoyed tea and huddle for warmth while some friends took camel rides around the tent. The angle was actually even crazier because I was also in a car at an angle, and didn’t have the good sense to use my new camera’s internal level to straighten out the horizon (which also had its own slopes.) A US dollar on the mirror and oil rigs in the background. Eventually we got out, and it was only a matter of time before the participants started going down the dunes. Some locals I talked to said that dune bashing is one of the few forms of local entertainment, especially in...

Subscribe Now

Join the Away She Goes mailing list to make sure you don't miss out! You'll get the monthly newsletter with posts, plus exclusives like travel discounts, never-before-seen photos and advanced travel plans that you won't find anywhere else. No spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time. 

Great Success!

Pin It on Pinterest

%d bloggers like this: